Fish Explorer Logo
Wyoming
Wyoming Fishing FishExplorer.com
Wyoming Fishing
Login Usr:Psd:
Don't have an account? Register now...
 
 
spacer spacer
spacer
Wyoming Fishing News Back to Wyoming Fishing News
Colorado: P&W Opens New State Wildlife Area East of Montrose
10/6/2017
Credit:
thefishingwire.com

MONTROSE, Colo. An innovative project developed cooperatively by Colorado Parks and Wildlife and the city of Montrose has resulted in the establishment of a new state wildlife area for CPW and a new park for the city

The Cerro Summit State Wildlife Area, a 162-acre parcel that includes a 40-acre reservoir, opened on Sept. 29. It's located about 15 miles east of Montrose just off U.S. Highway 50.

"This is a win-win-win for the public, the city and CPW," said Renzo DelPiccolo, area wildlife manager in Montrose. "This is a great example of what can be done by some out-of-the-box thinking."

CPW operated Chipeta Lake State Wildlife Area, located just south of Montrose, for many years. As the city grew it became obvious that the Chipeta Lake parcel would be more valuable as a park. DelPiccolo proposed to Montrose leaders that the Chipeta Lake property could be turned over to the city in exchange for using the Cerro Summit area as a state wildlife area.

City leaders and CPW negotiated an agreement that will protect the reservoir's water quality and keep the property in city ownership. The reservoir is the city's emergency water supply. CPW will regulate use at the state wildlife area, and the public will gain limited access to a property that has been closed. The agreement was signed in the fall of 2016.

No money needed to be exchanged to complete the agreement.

Patt Dorsey, southwest regional manager for Colorado Parks and wildlife, praised the deal.

"In the era we're living in, we're not going to get projects like this done unless we have great partnerships," Dorsey said. "The city of Montrose has been a great partner this wouldn't have happened without the city's leadership. We hope we can do more projects like this throughout Colorado."

Also helping to assure the success of the project was Montrose Mayor Judy Ann Files, State Senator Don Coram, Montrose County Commissioner Glen Davis, and the Bostwick Park Water Conservancy District.

The new wildlife area is open for fishing, hunting and wildlife viewing. To protect water quality, dogs are not allowed on the property. All fishing is catch-and-release by artificial lures and flies only.
The reservoir was stocked last fall with fingerling tiger trout that have already grown to 12 inches.

The property is also open to big-game and small game hunting during regular seasons. Because the area provides excellent winter range for deer and elk, and Gunnison-sage grouse habitat, the property will be closed seasonally from Nov. 30 through March 31.

DelPiccolo explained that state wildlife areas are managed differently than other public lands, such as U.S. Forest Service or BLM property. The areas are paid for by revenue from the sale of hunting and fishing licenses, and the properties are managed only for wildlife conservation and wildlife-related recreation. Access to Cerro Summit State Wildlife Area is by foot only it's an easy half-mile walk to the reservoir.

"At Cerro Summit we're protecting important wildlife habitat and providing an opportunity for people to hunt, fish and view wildlife in a beautiful setting," DelPiccolo said.

An entry sign is posted on the north side of U.S. Highway 50 at the entry that leads to the parking lot. The trail to the wildlife area is well marked. Visitors are asked to be sure to read the regulation signs before entering.

CPW is an enterprise agency, relying primarily on license sales, state parks fees and registration fees to support its operations, including: 41 state parks and more than 350 wildlife areas covering approximately 900,000 acres, management of fishing and hunting, wildlife watching, camping, motorized and non-motorized trails, boating and outdoor education. CPW's work contributes approximately $6 billion in total economic impact annually throughout Colorado.